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Four Walls 3 Review

ligerprince

Four walls have held its third show in London’s east end where the blue chips think they reign but lack the creative and youthful burst of diversity that the art world is craving so much right now especially after art Basel in Miami just a contest of who can see art through their darkest sunglasses and biggest wallets. The reformation of young artists is finally breaking through perhaps even a revolution, most likely both if we are honest.

Rosie Grace Ward, Sapling, 2019

The show of four walls 3 was in a downstairs strongly lit room of tight closed walls, thick painted brick layered walls and metal engineering escaping the walls. The space was compact, intimate and brutally beautiful.  Four artists involved each created a piece of work to be displayed on the floor or plinths as the brief indicated nothing to be hung on walls adding this further degree of intimacy like gathering around a fire (literally in one piece) to discuss to other viewers about it all at once. The four artists on show were: Rosie Grace Ward, Alexander Carey Morgan, George Stuart and Heyse Ip with Daniyel Lowden selling zines too.

Heyse Ip, Tomobako, 2019

Alex had presented a deep pigmented sand engulfing the bases of black plinths with candle holders and sensually deep black candles, his piece lied in the back far corner from the entrance but had its own gravity field as there was a constant flow of people gathered around it , perhaps due to its stature and almost powerful commitment to the delicate flames of the candles it provided this sense of security to the viewer.  If you were to focus on the flames of his candles even in this busy room of overflowing visitors the flames did twitch or stutter in their dance, they simply stood still elegantly.

The first piece that was in the room was hidden from my view at first and I must say nearly crunched underneath my boots as it lay so innocently on the floor, Rosie had turned a branch something so naturally occurring and un-daring into this violently beautiful sculpture with one of her almost definitive signatures of a metal insignia encased on top. The piece itself was so beautiful but perhaps the chosen way to display is what caused it to lack its power in the room. But maybe the innocence is what kept it so enrapturing to the eye as you entered the room and left especially with the flow of people coming and going, in and out.

Alexander Carey Morgan, Secrets of the Sand, 2019

Now to George Stuarts piece which to first glance didn’t excite the eyes, it felt like it belonged to a different show but the piece itself led the mind to think well why. Its separation from the others brought you in closer to decipher your own thoughts of it, a skeleton on a bed of a Christmas tree.  During the month of December, it has its own irony and humour but then is this a piece that has relevance in other months too does it speak deeper about the over economical and industrialised material world we live in. perhaps.

Last piece in the show was an almost resemblance to tom sachs way of using materials common to him to create others but much more simply and almost minimally approach to it. The piece felt that it was almost a society viewed way of common things projected with a zippo lighter and a plastic bottle surrounded by this almost industrially mad boxes or plinths to further enhance its commerciality as a concept.

George Stuart, My Mind has Bodies of its Own, 2019

The show showed 4 young artists each with a clearly strong sense of what they want to say and that not just this that they can in fact say it and with such ease. Four walls clearly are something to focus on from now on.

@ironknifechild

@alexandercareymorgan

@geostu

@heyseip

@fourwalls.uk

10011

Founded in 2017 as a print magazine, 10011 aims to showcase new visual and conceptual artists across the globe. With a nod to New York and a respect for academic tradition, the magazine publishes thoughtful online and print content. 10011 acknowledges the evolution of print, the magazine industry, and the art world at large by creating and curating new methods of art appreciation. To this end, video and live events are key practices.

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